#2 Inspire Interview Series – VENETIA FALCONER, TV PRESENTER, BLOGGER & more!

So last week in the first of our Inspire Interviews we heard from Kris Pace, the Branding Director of KOBOX. This week, we have a completely different inspiring story for you… and spoiler, she’s a total babe.

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Photo from venetiafalconer.com

Even if I have a tiny positive impact on just one person, I’m happy. Starting each day looking forward to the possibilities that lie ahead is a pretty wonderful feeling, too.  – Venetia Falconer, TV Presenter, blogger, podcaster and influencer.

Not only does she create my all time fave podcast – Talking Tastebuds – and have the kind of voice I just want to listen to on a permanent audiobook, she’s a multi-talented(and titled!) career queen absolutely bossing the online content space while making waves and gently pushing positive change without preaching in her treatment of ethical eating and sustainable fashion. And that’s not to mention her impressive TV career and presenting chops… this week’s Q&A is with the smart and super-beautiful Venetia Falconer!

B: One thing I really love about the work you do is this amazing energy you bring to everything you do – I first saw you talk on The Future of Wellness Panel where you presented for YellowKite Books – you’re obviously multi-passionate and multi-talented – can you talk a little bit about your background and how you became a presenter, blogger, vlogger, podcaster and influencer…?!

V: Thank you so much! I worked my way up behind the camera as a producer at MTV learning how to write scripts, film, edit, work with presenters and hone my interview skills. A friend then put me forward for a presenting job at 4Music and I thought I may as well go for it and I got the gig! I spent 18 months hosting their daily live show which was the best training ground. I was then picked up by Tastemade and fell in love with the digital sphere, so launched my YouTube channel and then my podcast, Talking Tastebuds.

B: You’re also vegan, and make it seem so easy! How did you make the transition to fully fledged veganism?

V: I took my sweet time – 5 months to be exact! And that’s always my number one top tip, go easy on yourself and take your time. It’s a big change to your body (I was eating eggs, dairy or meat with every meal), so it was necessary for me to ease my way into it.

B: Do you ever struggle to balance career and wellness? Any top tips for keeping that balance?

V: Of course. I meditate daily and try to take regular digital detoxes. Friends are my favourite remedy and a huge part of my life, so I’ll spend as much time as possible hanging out with those who lift my soul!

B: What are you most proud of in your career so far?

V: My podcast. It’s really exceeded all of my expectations.

B: What made you decide to launch ‘Talking Tastebuds’? (I’m literally addicted!) Any highlights and/or struggles?

V: I’m so pleased to hear that! I was taking some time out in Sri Lanka and the idea literally came to me (another reason why time-off is so important if you’re a creative).

Highlights have been hanging out with my heroes! Going to interview the Happy Pear in their hometown was particularly spectacular. Struggles are trying not to overthink about where to take it next…

B: Can you describe a (working) day in the life of Venetia Falconer?

This is hard as it varies so much day-to-day. I like to wake up at 6am so I have time to meditate and do yoga or a TRX class at Equilibrium, before launching into emails and editing. Then I’m often rushing around London to meetings, events, shoots and interviews.

It’s important to me to have a good work/life balance, so I aim to have my laptop closed by 7pm before enjoying dinner with a friend.

B: Have you made any mistakes along the way to where you are today and what have you learned from them, if so?

V: That you can never take a short-cut. You want to be able to do each and every part of your job as well as your boss can. And not to rush. The journey is the most enjoyable part!

B: You’ve been very open about anxiety and the importance of mental health which is so inspiring and has helped a lot of people. What would you say to someone who is suffering and needs help or advice?

V: You are not alone. Talk to someone. Don’t suffer in silence. And if you’re stuck in an Instagram vortex of self comparison, please switch off your phone.

B: What does ‘success’ mean to you?

V: Even if I have a tiny positive impact on just one person, I’m happy. Starting each day looking forward to the possibilities that lie ahead is a pretty wonderful feeling, too.  

B: Best and worst career advice you’ve ever been given?

V: Best: “It’s ok to say no”.
Worst: “Being vegan will make you less employable”. SEE YA.

B: What’s your life’s mission in a nutshell?

V: To spread a positive message around mental and physical well-being. And to encourage others not to mess with the animals and the planet… 🙂

**Quickfire Round**

Yoga or HIIT?

YOGA

Eggs or oats?

OATS every damn day

Pirates or Vampires?

PIRATES

Bali or Bora Bora?

BALI

Bikini or one piece?

BIKINI

Nature or nurture?

NATURE

Talent or hustle?

BOTH.

[vegan] chocolate or cheese?

CHOCOLATE

You’re doing cardio: podcast or playlist?

PLAYLIST – my own on spotify 😉

A good book or netflix?

Netflix

Fave quote:

“Comparison is the thief of joy”

It’s your last EVER day of your life. What do you do for the day?

Spend it on the coast surrounded by all of my favourite humans. There would be glorious sunshine and lots of incredible music. We’d dance a lot and have long rambling conversations about life. There would be exceptional coffee and food. I would be wearing an incredible boho-dress, but no shoes (minor but important detail).

And I have to ask your infamous podcast question – please can you share your ‘death row dinner’ (the last ever meal you’re going to have!):

This changes every single day. Currently it’s papaya drenched in fresh lime juice. Shared on a beach with David Attenborough, watching the sunrise.

I literally find Venetia’s podcast the most uplifting thing in the world and it’s so interesting and educational too – if you haven’t already gotten yourself hooked on Talking Tastebuds, get your fix here.

You can also catch Venetia on her websiteyoutube channel, instagram, facebook and twitter.

B xoxo

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LegallyBooked – AMERICANAH -Bookclub Pick #1

E12D67BC-3F70-4EA3-9C6C-C0F74A5B571FSo while we mostly deal in fitness and nutrition here on this site, as I mentioned on the new bookclub page, books have been so important to me since forever. Growing up I was always a strange little bookworm and didn’t go anywhere without one. People laughed at me ploughing through a book nearly bigger than me – The Lord of The Rings – at about 7 years old… And I think books are key to wellbeing and cultivating curiosity and generally just living, experiencing and understanding life. Stories and narrative seem to be our way of creating or imposing patterns and meaning on the world.

Doing an English Literature degree made me a major book snob for ages, but thankfully now I’ve opened out to enjoying a wide range that includes low brow as well as high, chick lit as well as Chaucer (only I never actually read much Chaucer!) So this LegallyBooked bookclub isn’t a formal bookclub in a sense, it’s just sharing both high and low brow books we can all enjoy and chat about, and exploring interesting ideas in them.

As promised, to kick off the LegallyBooked posts, for this month I’ve picked AMERICANAH by Chimamanada Ngozi Adiche. It’s not a new book, it’s just one I’ve been trying to get around to reading for aaaaages.

I’ve not quite finished it, but it’s an incredible book and the way it deals with race and identity is illuminating, and it touches on political correctness, loss, belonging… and I just absolutely loved it, you HAVE to read it.

Essentially, it examines race and what it is to live in the UK and USA as an African immigrant, but it is also a love story, and Adiche is amazing in the way her voice is able to penetrate the darkest corners of society and throw light on currents of racism without it feeling like a sociological text – it’s not sneering, or preachy, or awkward. It’s lucid, self-aware, vivid, touching.

I feel like I’ve learned a lot about race and privilege that I never really noticed before (which tends to happen – if something hasn’t been an issue for you or come to your attention before, it tends to be because you’re privileged). Something I’d never really been aware of before was the politicisation of African hair types, and the pressure for anyone with this hair type to use relaxers or more white hairstyles at work, for example.

I’ve linked below to a couple of reviews you might like to read, and below are some “bookclub” style question recommendations for you to ponder from ReadingGroupGuides.com.

Bookclub questions (link to source above)

1. The first part of Ifemelu’s story is told in flashback while she is having her hair braided at a salon before she returns to Nigeria. Why might Adichie have chosen this structure for storytelling? What happens when the narrator shifts to Obinze’s story? How conscious are you as a reader about the switches in narrative perspective?

2. The novel opens in the Ivy League enclave of Princeton, New Jersey. Ifemelu likes living there because “she could pretend to be someone else…someone adorned with certainty” (3). But she has to go to the largely black city of Trenton, nearby, to have her hair braided. Does this movement between cities indicate a similar split within Ifemelu? Why does she decide to return to Nigeria after 13 years in America?

3. How much does your own race affect the experience of reading this or any novel? Does race affect a reader’s ability to identify or empathize with the struggles of Ifemelu and Obinze? Ifemelu writes in her blog that “black people are not supposed to be angry about racism” because their anger makes whites uncomfortable (223). Do you agree?

4. Aunty Uju’s relationship with the General serves as an example of one mode of economic survival for a single woman: she attaches herself to a married man who supports her in return for sexual access. But Uju runs into a serious problem when the General dies and political power shifts. Why, given what you learn of Uju’s intelligence and capabilities later, do you think she chose to engage in this relationship with the General instead of remaining independent?

5. Ifemelu feels that Aunty Uju is too eager to capitulate to the demands of fitting in. Uju says, “You are in a country that is not your own. You do what you have to do if you want to succeed” (120). Is Uju right in compromising her own identity to a certain extent? How is Dike affected by his mother’s struggles?

6. In the clothing shop she visits with her friend Ginika, Ifemelu notices that the clerk, when asking which of the salespeople helped her, won’t say, “Was it the black girl or the white girl?” because that would be considered a racist way to identify people. “You’re supposed to pretend that you don’t notice certain things,” Ginika tells her (128). In your opinion and experience, is this a good example of American political correctness about race? Why does Ifemelu find it curious? Do you think these attitudes differ across the United States?

7. For a time, Ifemelu is a babysitter for Kimberly, a white woman who works for a charity in Africa. Adichie writes that “for a moment Ifemelu was sorry to have come from Africa, to be the reason that this beautiful woman, with her bleached teeth and bounteous hair, would have to dig deep to feel such pity, such hopelessness. She smiled brightly, hoping to make Kimberly feel better” (152). How well does Kimberly exemplify the liberal guilt that many white Americans feel toward Africa and Africans?

8. Ifemelu’s experience with the tennis coach is a low point in her life. Why does she avoid being in touch with Obinze afterward (157–58)? Why doesn’t she read his letters? How do you interpret her behavior?

9. In her effort to feel less like an outsider, Ifemelu begins faking an American accent. She feels triumphant when she can do it, and then feels ashamed and resolves to stop (175). Which aspects of her becoming an American are most difficult for Ifemelu as she struggles to figure out how much she will give up of her Nigerian self?

10. Ifemelu realizes that naturally kinky hair is a subject worth blogging about. She notices that Michelle Obama and Beyoncé never appear in public with natural hair. Why not? “Because, you see, it’s not professional, sophisticated, whatever, it’s just not damn normal” (299). Read the blog post “A Michelle Obama Shout-Out Plus Hair as Race Metaphor” (299–300), and discuss why hair is a useful way of examining race and culture.

11. What does Ifemelu find satisfying about her relationships with Curt and Blaine? Why does she, eventually, abandon each relationship? Is it possible that she needs to be with someone Nigerian, or does she simply need to be with Obinze?

12. Ifemelu’s blog is a venue for expressing her experience as an African immigrant and for provoking a conversation about race and migration. She says, “I discovered race in America and it fascinated me” (406). She asks, “How many other people had become black in America?” (298). Why is the blog so successful? Are there any real-life examples that you know of similar to this?

13. Obinze goes to London, and when his visa expires he is reduced to cleaning toilets (238); eventually he is deported. On his return home, “a new sadness blanketed him, the sadness of his coming days, when he would feel the world slightly off-kilter, his vision unfocused” (286). How does his experience in London affect the decisions he makes when he gets back to Lagos? Why does he marry Kosi? How do these choices and feelings compare to Ifemelu’s?

14. While she is involved with Curt, Ifemelu sleeps with a younger man in her building, out of curiosity. “There was something wrong with her. She did not know what it was but there was something wrong with her. A hunger, a restlessness. An incomplete knowledge of herself. The sense of something farther away, beyond her reach” (291–92). Is this a common feeling among young women in a universal sense, or is there something more significant in Ifemelu’s restlessness? What makes hers particular, if you feel it is?

15. When reading Obinze’s conversations with Ojiugo, his now-wealthy friend who has married an EU citizen, did you get the sense that those who emigrate lose something of themselves when they enter the competitive struggle in their new culture (Chapter 24), or is it more of a struggle to maintain that former self? Does Adichie suggest that this is a necessary sacrifice? Are all of the characters who leave Nigeria (such as Emenike, Aunty Uju, Bartholomew, and Ginika) similarly compromised?

16. Aunty Uju becomes a doctor in America but still feels the need to seek security through an alliance with Bartholomew, whom she doesn’t seem to love. Why might this be? How well does she understand what her son, Dike, is experiencing as a displaced, fatherless teenager? Why might Dike have attempted suicide?

17. Is the United States presented in generally positive or generally negative ways in AMERICANAH?

18. The term “Americanah” is used for Nigerians who have been changed by having lived in America. Like those in the novel’s Nigerpolitan Club, they have become critical of their native land and culture: “They were sanctified, the returnees, back home with an extra gleaming layer” (408). Is the book’s title meant as a criticism of Ifemelu, or simply an accurate word for what she fears she will become (and others may think of her)?

19. How would you describe the qualities that Ifemelu and Obinze admire in each other? How does Adichie sustain the suspense about whether Ifemelu and Obinze will be together until the very last page? What, other than narrative suspense, might be the reason for Adichie’s choice in doing so? Would you consider their union the true homecoming, for both of them?

20. Why is it important to have the perspective of an African writer on race in America? How does reading the story make you more alert to race, and to the cultural identifications within races and mixed races? Did this novel enlarge your own perspective, and if so, how?

Reviews you may like

The Guardian review

The New York Times review

The Independent review

Financial Times review

#1 Inspire Interview Series – KRIS PACE, BRAND DIRECTOR of KOBOX

Welcome to the first in this series of Inspire Interviews! These will be permanently available on the careers section of this site, which I’m currently expanding so keep your eyes peeled…

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It’s no secret how much I love KOBOX and their awesome Brand Director, Kris Pace  has generously agreed to answer some questions for us today on all things work, fitness, boxing, branding and a cheeky quickfire round!

It’s always really interesting to go behind the scenes of our favourite brands and companies, as I think so many people aspire to work for places they can be proud of doing what they love.

Don’t get yourself into a position where you’re representing someone or something you don’t care about, because anyone you meet will see right through it. Genuine passion goes so far in this world, and if you’re proud of and fervid about who or what you’re representing, you won’t go far wrong. If you don’t believe in what you’re showcasing to the world, you don’t deserve to be doing it. – Kris Pace, KOBOX Brand Director.

Kris, as mentioned above, is KOBOX’s Brand Director, and formerly worked for Men’s Health. In addition to being a boxing badass (check out his instagram here) he’s doing an incredible work for a boutique fitness concept that has shaken London up a storm, with celebrity fans including supermodel Jourdan Dunn, singers Cheryl Cole and Ellie Goulding, Pussycat Doll Ashley Roberts, Made in Chelsea stars JP, Jess Woodley Oliver Proudlock and more.

We touch on this in the interview, but KOBOX really does change lives, and so it’s no wonder the ‘fight club meets nightclub’ has been a roaring success. While KOBOX’s brand is amazing, clearly part of what makes it so incredible is it’s so much MORE than a brand, there’s a real sense of this KOBOX community that they’ve built, and as Kris says below there’s a sense of pride in everyone working there in getting to contribute to something bigger… so let’s dig in to chatting with Kris and find out his secrets to work success, how he ended up this amazing role, and his sport and fitness approach… Plus find out which KOBOX instructors he’d rather hug, marry and waterballoon…!

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B: Can you tell us a little bit about how you came to be Kobox’s Brand Director – did you always know this was the kind of work you wanted to do?

K: I met Shane and Ian Streetz when I worked for Men’s Health magazine. The team there wanted to do a 12-week body transformation, through boxing, for a feature. Whilst working there, we’d all heard a lot of good stuff about KOBOX, so we went down to see what it was like, and we knew instantly it was the right place to host the transformation…

Once the feature had finished, I’d loved being there so much that I kept going back, both to train and to socialise. The business was growing rapidly, and the Brand Director role was formed about 6 months later. I jumped at the chance, and the rest is history…

B: Can you describe a (working) day in the life for you at Kobox HQ?

K: Everything and anything can happen in typical day at KOBOX. There are so many variables at a boxing club, you simply have to be on top of everything. My day can vary from cleaning the office and serving protein shakes to conceiving and executing authentic online content or meeting people to further expand one of many sides of the business. But, for definite, the main stream of consciousness for every single employee at KOBOX, daily, is to make sure we’re giving people the best 50 minutes of their day when they come in to take a class.

B: Have you always been passionate about fitness?

K: Sport, all my life. Fitness, all my adult life. I think naturally I like to try new things, and test myself in new waters. I’ve body-built, gone super heavy but then also gone super slim for a triathlon, then tried my hand at boxing… it’s important to see what you’re made of.

B: What advice would you give to someone looking to go into branding/marketing roles?

K: Don’t get yourself into a position where you’re representing someone or something you don’t care about, because anyone you meet will see right through it. Genuine passion goes so far in this world, and if you’re proud of and fervid about who or what you’re representing, you won’t go far wrong. If you don’t believe in what you’re showcasing to the world, you don’t deserve to be doing it.

B: Have you made any mistakes along the way to where you are today and what have you learned from them, if so?

K: Of course, many. I learn something every single day, and I’d never want that to change.

Whether it’s something that has differed from your expectations; something you attested to but it turned out otherwise; or even if it’s something that you’re proved right on, you learn every time. You can’t predict the future, but you can take note and not make the same mistake twice.  

B: What are the best and worst bits of your job? Any top challenges and/or achievements?

K: Genuinely, there are too many best bits to choose from. I get to walk into KOBOX every day, which is a place I fell in love with before I worked there. But to name a few? The team, the ambition, the classes themselves and the difference they make to people’s lives – which is extraordinary, and I feel privileged to be a part of that.

Worse bit? Sloane Square’s on the District Line, which is, without doubt, the most lamentable tube line ever made. Ever. I never moan about it, though. Ask anyone…

B: Do you do KOBOX workouts yourself or do you like to mix up your regime? Any favourite ways to train?

K: If I’m honest, I wish I had more time to do class. It’s tricky for me to pick a class time and stick to it, as my day can change at the drop of a hat. But I love Core Day!

Away from class, I like to lift weights, but with a circuit/HIIT element to it… I’ve started to round up the trainers to participate, which helps with the old wilting willpower!

B: Best and worst career advice you’ve ever been given?

K: Best: Trust your gut.

Worst: Tailor yourself to the role.

B: Do you have a role model or mentor you look to for career inspiration?

K: I wouldn’t say one in particular. A lot of people are full of hot air, but there are also people who talk a lot of sense. Pick attentively what ‘words of wisdom’ you take with you.

B: Who are your fave fitness icons?

K: Eric ‘The King’ Cantona. My all-time sporting hero, but not necessarily a fitness icon. It’s hard to look past Rich Froning in that sense – what he’s achieved is incredible. I think he now defines modern-day fitness.  

B: And finally, what does ‘success’ mean to you?

K: Retiring when I’m 35.

Joke. Building something that will outlast you.

B: Bonus question: which Kobox instructor would you least like to get in a ring with and why?!

Any of them, they’d all batter me in the ring.

**Quickfire Round**

Fave combo on the heavy bags:

2. 2. 2. 2. 2. 2…

Eggs or oats?

Oats.

Burpee or bear crawl?

Neither, they’re both grim.

Nature or nurture?

Nurture. It’s the only thing we have control over.

Talent or hustle?

Hustle.

The best KOBOX shake on the menu?

Peanut Uppercut. Or the Suckerpunch (just because I named it).

Chocolate or cheese?

Chocolate.

Boxing or MMA?

Boxing.

You have to hug, marry and water-balloon 3 kobox instructors – which ones do you choose?! 😉

Hug: Ollie. Who doesn’t want to cuddle the #BrownBear?

Marry: Maciela. She’s just awesome.

Water-Balloon: Ian Streetz. He wins at everything and I’ve had enough of it.

Fave movie:

Rockstar.

It’s your last EVER meal of your life. What do you order/make?

A proper, old-school Indian. Not one of these fancy new ones.

Thanks so much Kris for answering all of these questions and sharing your work and fitness insights! You can find Kris on instagram here, and all things KOBOX here. Keep an eye out for the next Inspire Interview coming soon!

B xox

The Secret to Meghan Markle’s Pre-Wedding Glow…?

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So this week an email landed in my inbox from Rhiannon Lambert (her Rhitrition newsletter has all kinds of interesting nutrition nerdy news and tips so do subscribe!) linking me to an article in The Independent about Meghan Markle’s favourite smoothie. But the article misses out another favourite recipe of Meghan’s that she mentions in an interview with The Chalkboard, so scroll down to unearth this extra little royal gem!

It’s no secret that this gorgeous, smart, soon-to-be-royal was a fan of all things wellness before she took up with the Prince… and all fairytales need to feature magic and potions somewhere, right?!

Rhiannon Lambert, as I’m sure you all already know if you’ve been around this blog/insta a while, is an amazing Harley Street nutritionist (info on her book here) and in the article mentioned above, she breaks down the health benefits of the ingredients to Meghan’s go-to smoothie. The recipe Meghan claimed she uses can also be found in this article in Hello Magazine, but Rhiannon highlights how the protein powder could be improved to a healthier one, so I’m going to share a take on the smoothie that’s more in line with these Harley Street guidelines ❤

Meghan’s love of health was formerly shared with fans on her now-defunct lifestyle website, The Tig, but you can find some more goss about her healthy living and lifestyle philosophy in this Living Well With… Meghan Markle interview by The Chalkboard.

With the Royal Wedding coming up, I thought I’d experiment and give you a recipe made with these ingredients that you can blend up in time for the celebrations along with the bonus extra the Independent missed out… who knows, maybe we’ll get Meghan’s glow if we drink enough of it 😉

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  • 1/2 cup frozen blueberries
  • 1/2 cup almond milk
  • 1 scoop of vanilla protein – Neat is a fave of mine, but see Rhiannon Lambert Harley Street nutritionist recommendations here!
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tsps chia seeds
  • 1/2 cup coconut water
  • *Blend all ingredients*… & then:
  • Top with some unsweetened dessicated coconut, 3 blueberries and a mint leaf or two!

 

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  • 1 frozen mango
  • Squeeze of fresh lime
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 cup coconut water
  • (optional: 1/2 banana or 1 Satsuma and 1 small handful of spinach)
  • *Blend all ingredients*… & then:
  • Serve with a little pineapple and/or a cherry, and voila!
  • (Also optional to serve: small wedge of lime/lemon)

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There you have it – two royally delicious smoothies fit for a princess!

If you liked having a little nose at this, you may also enjoy this piece by Best Health Meghan Markle: The Beauty of Balance for a Future Princess where Meghan discusses her yoga practice.

xoxo

Brand New Inspire Interview Series – launching on Friday!

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I am really excited to be launching an interview series with some incredible people. Whether your dream job involves burpees and barbells, boardrooms or business-meetings (or none of the above!), I’ve chatted to some reeeeally cool people who graciously agreed to share their stories about what they do and how they got there.

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Coming your way in these Q&As will be:

  • Top tips from incredible entrepreneurs, industry shakers and influencers
  • Their stories, insights and career tips
  • How they balance wellness and work
  • Secrets to their success
  • & more!

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Why?

While this blog is very ‘health’, ‘fitness’ and ‘nutrition’ focussed (I mean, “gymliving” features in the name!), I’ve also always been honest that fitness isn’t my whole life – career is important to me and mine is actually in law rather than the fitness industry (I’m “legallygymliving”, after all!). And another part of this picture is that ever-elusive ‘balance’ – maintaining mental and physical health, and enjoying interests, family, friends and loved ones rather than being chained to the grindstone.

A huuuuuge part of my view of the world and the content I try to share with you all is finding a way to make health and wellness and working out fit around YOUR lives. And also sharing non-fitness related content that can inspire and enhance your career and all the other things that are important to you, because there’s more to living well than matcha lattes and working on our abs!

I’ve been interviewing some incredible people who are just so inspiring for all kinds of different reasons – some work in careers related in some way to fitness or wellness, others don’t – from influencers & entrepreneurs to lawyers & financiers, I wanted to share with you all some of the people who have been generous enough to let me interview them, and share their amazing insights and stories with you!

Whatever you want to work in, I think you can learn a lot from exploring new areas (my marketing, events and account management ‘first’ career taught me a lot, for example, and while I may not use it while I’m drafting legal docs day to day, you can chalk everything up to life experience and you’d be surprised when things pop up!) so hopefully even if there’s not someone I’ve interviewed who you want to exactly-to-the-letter model your path on, you’ll find some inspo and top tips to getting to where you want to be!

First up we have a fab interview from the insaaaaaaaaane Kris Pace, Brand Director at Kobox (& formerly of Men’s Health)! Watch this space… it will go live on Friday 🙂

B xoxo

Why I’m dipping back into BBG & 5 reasons you should too!

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My original bbg progress – from post-bulimia weight gain and too much alcohol to fitter, healthier & happier!

So as you may have seen a couple of years ago on this blog, I LOVED Kayla Itsines’ bikini body guide… when the app first launched I was SO INTO IT. Like, getting my trophies every week was actually weirdly compulsively motivating… I’d get upset if my phone died and I missed a trophy! I also real results, and fast, without over-training (pictured above).

One of the things it did was help me fall in love with fitness. I moved on, after 25 weeks+ of religious BBG to try weightlifting… then to mixing things up, my own programmes, boxing, kobox, my own combos of classes, HIIT and plyos… I did a little bit of GraceFitUK’s guide… I’ve become a bit of a dabbler. Which is great! Sometimes. But as we’ve discussed, routine is a cornerstone to long-term health because you can’t rely on motivation 24/7. Also, work is my main priority now, and so fitness has to fit around that.

I recommended it to a friend recently and it got me thinking about it again. It was the longest I’ve stuck at doing exactly the same routine…

So basically, I do love the wider fitness scene and I’m so glad BBG launched me headfirst into that, and built up a good fitness foundation for me, or I’d never have survived a kobox session!

I won’t go back to JUST doing BBG. But I am going back to trying to do it as my default base.

This is why.

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  1. Community (sounds cheesy but it’s so true!) I miss the sense of community we had, with all the bbg girls checking in on insta every time we did a workout. I made lovely real life friends through the historical meetups [blogged here!] and online community where we actually bonded over a love of Kayla and law – the lovely Tash (who eventually vanished 😦 without a trace) and amazing Alex (now a big blogging deal and serious ab goals, the girl you all know as @theleanlawyer, but I met her as just another lovely, down to earth bbg fan about to travel the world!) Plus the epic online community – some of us have stuck together for ages (oh hey Andrenna Taylor!) Yes other apps and guides promise this kind of community – I’ve dabbled in Tone It Up (OMG you guys, can you believe Kat is pregnant SQUEEEEEE?!!!), Grace Fit Guide… but it just hasn’t stuck or worked at the same level for me. I feel a bit isolated now – I obviously am plugged in to the instagram fitness community, but do my own thing so often that when motivation dips it can be a bit blue and lonely!

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    Pic from my first ever London bbg meet-up!
  2. Home sweet home suitability! When I stopped using BBG, I had got to the point where I loved the gym, so I needed a Kayla-at-home programme less, but now I’m actually craving home workouts again. The office gym is okay, but I don’t always have tonnes of time, and also it can be weird working out in a raggedy sports bra next to very senior members of the firm who can see you looking disgusting and totally unprofessional and tomato-faced haha! Not when I feel at my best! Also, increasingly, the more time I spend at the office, the more I just want to be home. Even if that means working out in my spare room / dressing room rather than a gym! pexels-photo-221247.jpeg
  3. Time & ease  While my hours are pretty decent for a trainee lawyer right now (touch wood!), in my next seat this is almost guaranteed to change. I won’t have hours or bundles of energy to gym, there’ll be a lot more finishing work in the early hours, and I like my regime to be sustainable. BBG’s effective 28 minute workouts can be done anywhere with so little equipment.pexels-photo-607812.jpeg
  4. App upgrades – the app has come along way since I ditched my subscription. It now features BBG stronger, Kayla’s weights and gym-based programme, Kelsey Wells’ PWR weight training programme and also Sjana Elise‘s mind/body yoga-based programme, so you get far more options for progression when you eventually fatigue of 50 weeks straight bbg!)pexels-photo-247361.jpeg
  5. It’s challenging no matter your fitness level & hits the physique type/goals I now have – I don’t need it to build base fitness anymore like the first time I did it… but that’s okay! (Although it’s PERFECT if that’s what you’re looking for!) If you need to be pushed, though, you can do more reps, add more weight, or go faster, harder… you don’t have to plateau! Also I have, since bbg, built some muscle, eaten more food, got some glutes and abs and quads a lil thicker… now I don’t feel a need to build, I just want to do the fat loss thing… which Kayla’s original Sweat programme kicks butt at! And if I ever DO want to bulk and build again, I have the PWR to do just that with Kelsey or get BBG Stronger with Kayla!

So those are the reasons I’m aiming to incorporate more bbg into my life, and top 5 reasons I’d highly recommend it for you too!

Kayla’s website is here and the app is available from the app store at half price [on the day of writing] at just £7.49 per month for an annual subscription! (Or a free month trial and £14.99 monthly thereafter!)

B xoxox